• Chana futures dip 1.64 pc on tepid demand

    Chana prices slipped 1.64 per cent to close at Rs 3,949 per quintal in futures trade today as participants reduced exposure following subdued demand in spot market. Profit-booking at existing higher levels also weighed on the sentiment. In futures trading, at the National Commodity and Derivatives Exchange, chana for delivery in current month declined by Rs 66, or 1.64 per cent, to close at Rs 3,949 per quintal, with an open interest of 29,350 lots. Read more


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  • Mixed trend in pulses

      Barring chana, majority of pulse seeds and pulses either ruled stable or traded lower on weak physical demand with masur (bold) at ₹3,450-3,500 a quintal, (down ₹200 from last week), while masur (Madhya Pradesh) ruled at₹3,200. Masur dal (medium) fetched ₹4,750-4,850, while masur dal (bold) ruled at ₹5,100-5,200. Moong (bold) was at ₹5,000-5,200,  Read more


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  • Uptrend in pulses halted

    Declining chana prices, weak physical demand and steady rise in arrival of new pulse seeds have arrested uptrend in pulses with tur (Maharashtra) being quoted at ₹4,150 a quintal, while tur (Madhya Pradesh) ruled at ₹3,700-3,800. Tur dal (sawa no.) fetched ₹5,700 a quintal, tur dal (full) ₹6,200, while tur marka was ₹6,500 respectively. Read more


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  • Select pulses extend losses on weak demand

    New Delhi, Dec 27 () Select pulses, led by gram, maintained its sliding trend for the third day as prices fell by up to Rs 200 per quintal in the wholesale pulses market on considerable fall in demand from retailers and dal mills. Marketmen said, besides easing demand from retailers and dal mills, sufficient stocks position on increased supplies from producing regions weighed on gram and other pulses. In the national capital, gram, gramdal local and best quality remained under selling pressure and lost another Rs 200 each to Rs 4,250-4,800, Rs 4,900-5,300 and Rs 5,300-5,400 per quintal respectively. Kabuli gram small variety followed suit and declined by a similar margin to Rs 7,600-8,600 per quintal. Read more


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  • Import curbs may not help tur, chana

    PUNE: Despite government restricting import pulses with hike in import duty, prices of tur and chana are expected to remain under pressure and rule lower than the minimum support price (MSP) levels announced by the government. MSP of tur is Rs 5,450/quintal including bonus of Rs 200/quintal while the MSP of chana is Rs 4,400/ quintal including bonus of Rs 150/quintal. According to the first advance estimate of kharif foodgrain crops, tur production is expected to decline by 16.5% from 4.78 million tonnes in 2016-17 to 3.99 million tonnes in 2017-18. Sowing of chana has increased by about 14% over the previous year from 87.7 lakh hectare to about 100 lakh hectare as on December 22. Read more


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  • Chana futures down 3.11 pc on muted demand

    New Delhi, Dec 27 Chana prices slipped 3.11 per cent to Rs 3,955 per quintal in futures trade today as participants reduced exposure following subdued demand at the spot market amid adequate stocks. Profit-booking at existing higher levels also weighed on the sentiment. In futures trading at the National Commodity and Derivatives Exchange, chana for delivery in January month declined by Rs 127, or 3.11 per cent, to Rs 3,955 per quintal, with an open interest of 40,950 lots. Read more


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  • Select pulses fall on easing demand

    New Delhi, Dec 25 () Select pulses led by gram fell by up to Rs 300 per quintal at the wholesale pulses market on fall in demand from retailers. Marketmen said besides easing demand from retailers at existing higher levels, adequate stocks position on increased supplies from producing belts mainly led to decline in gram and other pulses prices. In the national capital, gram eased to Rs 4,600-5,100 against last close of Rs 4,850-5,300 per quintal. Its dal local and best quality were down by Rs 300 each to Rs 5,300- 5,700 and Rs 5,700-5,800 per quintal respectively. Kabuli gram small variety followed suit and lost Rs 200 to Rs 7,800-8,800 per quintal. Read more


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  • 30 per cent import duty on chana, masoor to control cheap imports

    The government has imposed 30 per cent import duty on chickpeas (chana) and lentils (masoor) effectively immediately on Thursday. This decision has been taken to protect the interest of farmers.  India is world’s largest importer and consumer of pulses. The government is expecting the production of chickpeas and lentils to be on higher side during upcoming Rabi season. A rise in chana production will help the country to reduce pulses imports over the next 2-3 years.  In the international market, the price of pulses is comparatively low compared with the domestic market. This has led to an alarming situation as the imports have grown substantially and has corroded the prices in the domestic market affecting farmers. Read more


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  • Kabuli gram, gram spurt by up to Rs 1,000/qtl

    New Delhi, Dec 22 () Prices of kabuli gram and gram climbed by up to Rs 1,000 per quintal at the wholesale pulses market on brisk buying by stockists amid hike in import duty. Masoor, arhar and other pulses also spurted. Marketmen said persistent buying by stockists on upsurge in demand from dal mills and government's decision to impose a hefty 30 per cent import duty on chana and masoor dal to curb cheaper shipments, mainly buoyed the sentiment. "To protect interest of farmers, the government has decided to impose 30 per cent import duty on chana and masoor with immediate effect," the finance ministry said yesterday. Read more


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  • India imposes duties on chickpeas and lentils

    WINNIPEG — India is introducing 30 per cent tariffs on imports of chickpeas and lentils, the government announced today. The import duties follow the 50 percent tariff on yellow peas that India introduced in November, and come as part of ongoing efforts by India to support farmers. “Production of chana (chickpeas) and masoor (lentils) are expected to be high during the forthcoming rabi season, and cheap imports, if allowed unabated, are likely to adversely affect the interest of the farmers,” said the Indian government in a news release, adding that the import duties were imposed in order to protect farmers. Read more


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