• Govt pegs 2.78% drop in kharif foodgrain output at 134.67 mt

    The country’s kharif foodgrain production is estimated to decline by 2.78 per cent to 134.67 million tonnes (mt), mainly because of patchy monsoon in parts of central India along with floods in parts of Rajasthan, Gujarat, Uttar Pradesh, Bihar and Assam. This year’s kharif production would still be higher than the average production of the five years between 2011-12 and 2015-16, that is, 128.24 mt, the agriculture ministry said in a statement. According to the first advance estimate for major kharif crops released on Monday, the output of rice, pulses and coarse cereals is projected to decline from a record level of 138.52 mt in the previous year’s kharif season.Read more


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  • Govt vows to make farmers economically stable by 2022

    New Delhi: Agriculture and Farmers Welfare Minister Radha Mohan Singh has said that the various development and welfare schemes launched by the Government in the last three years have helped farmers reap a record production of food grains during 2016-17. Inaugurating the four-day Pandit Deen Dayal Upadhyay Centenary Krishi Unnati Mela in Mathura, Singh observed, “The production of pulses increased to 22.40 mt in 2016-17 from 16.35 mt in the previous year. Similarly, the output of food grains increased from 265 mt to 273.38 mt in 2016-17 and that of horticulture increased from 244 mt to 295 mt.”Read more


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  • Govt move to monetise farmers’ produce stocked in warehouses

    New Delhi: In a way to reduce farmers’ dependency on moneylenders, the government has decided to monetise their agricultural produce stocked in government-managed warehouses. As per the new move, the government would issue an electronic receipt to farmers with the total value of the product stored in warehouses, which can be mortgaged as an asset. According to officials of Consumer Affairs Ministry, the issued receipt would be treated as an asset of farmers by the banks and can be monetised to avail loans from any nationalised banks. The new scheme has been christened as Electronic Negotiable Warehousing Receipt System, which would be launched on September 26 by Union Consumer Affairs Minister Ramvilas Paswan.Read more


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  • Government woos Saurashtra farmers

    AHMEDABAD: On Sunday, at a quickly convened meeting, the Gujarat government announced the procurement of groundnut at Rs 900 per 20 kg (or maund), to woo Saurashtra groundnut farmers in poll-bound Gujarat.Chief minister Vijay Rupani said the new procurement price will be beneficial for farmers as the government expects a robust kharif groundnut crop. He also said that procurement will begin from Labh Panchami, the fifth day after Diwali. The prevailing market rate for groundnut is Rs 600 per 20 kg, Rupani said. The move is likely to put an additional burden of Rs 500 crore on the state exchequer.Read more


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  • DEFICIENT RAIN WORRIES FARMERS

    Farmers in Garhwa district are a worried lot as their crops face threat due to insufficient rain this year. Due to deficient rainfall the paddy, maize and oil crops face a serious threat as the availability of water is grossly insufficient to meet the requirements. The deficient rainfall has taken its toll on the kharif crops with the district farmers managing to sow crops on an area of 106811  hectares against the target of 134170 hectares, nearly 85 per cent of the targeted area. While only 17.97 per cent sowing target for coarse grains could be achieved in the district sowing these on 649 hectares as against the target of 3610 hectares, maize could be sown on 18684 hectares as against the target of 27200 hectares (68.69 per cent).Similarly, pulses could be sown on 29654 hectares against the target of 41600 hectares (71.28 per cent).Read more


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  • Kharif rice output may dip by 1.9 mn ton; pulses down 70000 ton

    India’s rice output is likely to fall by 1.9 million tonnes (MT) to 94.48 MT in kharif season this year on account of poor rain as well as floods, official sources said.The production of pulses and coarse cereals is estimated to have fallen, dragging the overall foodgrains output in kharif (summer-sown) season to 134.67 MT from record 138.52 MT in last kharif, as per the sources.Kharif foodgrain basket comprises rice, pulses and coarse cereals. Harvesting will start from next month.Barring sugarcane, the production of all major kharif crops is likely to decline.The Union Agriculture Ministry will release its first advance estimate on Monday.Rice ouptut is estimated to fall at 94.48 MT in the kharif season of the 2017-18 crop year (July-June) from the record 96.39 MT in last kharif, the official who did not wish to be named said. Pulses output could drop to 8.71 MT from the record 9.42 MT due to depressed prices and poor rains.Read more


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  • Myth of a normal monsoon: Deficient rainfall has farmers staring at loss

    Ompal Singh Aanchal’s two-acre farm in Kurar Ibrahimpur village of Haryana’s Sonipat is a sight every farmer dreads — a partially-withered crop of sorghum, locally called jowar.“My jowar has dried up,” he says, cursing no one in particular.“This time we got good rain in the beginning but the last good spell was a month ago.”Rain is crucial for sorghum that 62-year-old Aanchal mostly uses as fodder for his six buffaloes. He also has a standing crop of rice on another three acres that needs a lot more water.Sonipat, however, has seen deficient rainfall for five straight weeks at 36% below normal for this period.The first five weeks of the monsoon season beginning June 1 recorded excess rainfall ranging between 44% and 317%.The southwest monsoon is the lifeblood for India’s farm sector, delivering 70% of the country’s annual rainfall, and is crucial for an estimated 263 million farmers.Poor monsoon rainfall is bad news for the farmer and ultimately for the economy with nearly half of India’s population dependent on farm income. Read more


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  • Indian agriculture lacks a vision. Why this is a bigger problem than floods and droughts

    It has often been suggested that whatever is said about India, the opposite may also be true. If there is one area where this paradox applies, it is in India’s monsoon behaviour, which directly impacts our agricultural growth story year after year. Thus, even as the India Meteorological Department (IMD) predicted a “normal” monsoon this year, Bihar and parts of Gujarat saw huge floods and many states faced deficient rainfall. And even as the IMD is still to withdraw its last forecast of “normal” rainfall (meaning, a total precipitation all over India of plus or minus 10% of the long period average), latest ground reports suggest that nearly 60% of our land area received deficient rainfall, and around 225 districts may be in the grip of moderate-to-acute drought conditions.Read more


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  • Organic farming: Real challenge that India is facing is lack of policy

    The Indian government has been undertaking measures to promote organic farming with the aim to improve soil fertility and help to double the farmers’ incomes by the year 2022. The Prime Minister had visited Sikkim—which is India’s first organic state—and encouraged other states to replicate the “Sikkim model”. Some of the policy initiatives to promote organic farming and exports include development of an organic regulation for exports by the Agricultural and Processed Food Products Export Development Authority (APEDA), removal of quantitative restriction on organic food exports, providing subsidies to farmers under the Paramparagat Krishi Vikas Yojana (PKVY) in partnership with the state governments, and other schemes such as the Mission Organic Value Chain Development for North Eastern Region. Read more


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