• Government Lifts Curbs On Export Of Pulses As Country Sits On Huge Stock

    The government has removed export curbs on all varieties of pulses to ensure farmers get remunerative prices as domestic rates have crashed below MSP in view of record production. Pulses production in India, the world’s largest producer and importer, touched an all-time high of 22.95 million tonnes in the 2016-17 crop year (July-June). Moreover, the country imported about 5 million tonnes pulses last fiscal, leading to huge availability in the domestic market and a price crash.The government is expecting bumper output even this year and it is also sitting on 1.8 million tonnes of buffer stock.The annual domestic demand is around 24 million tonnes.“The Cabinet Committee on Economic Affairs (CCEA) has given its approval for removal of prohibition on export of all types of pulses to ensure that farmers have greater choice in marketing their produce and in getting better remuneration for their produce,” an official statement said.Read more


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  • Govt allows export of all pulses

    In a move that will get farmers better remuneration for their produce, the Centre has decided to remove the prohibition on export of all types of pulses. While allowing exports, the Cabinet Committee on Economic Affairs (CCEA) on Thursday also empowered the Committee of Secretaries (CoS) on pulses to review the export/import policy on the food crop and consider measures such as quantitative restrictions, prior registration and changes in import duties depending on domestic production and demand, domestic and international prices as well as international trade volumes. In September, the Centre had lifted the ban on export of tur, urad and moong dal. The export restrictions, stocking limits for private traders and not allowing futures trade in a year that had a bumper crop had created a havoc on the pulses front, agricultural economist Ashok Gulati told BusinessLine. Read more


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  • India pea tariffs part of broader self-sufficiency goal

    Winnipeg | CNS Canada — India’s surprise move to impose 50 per cent tariffs on pea imports was a shock to Canadian exporters, but the tariffs were introduced to help India’s own farmers as the country works toward self-sufficiency in pulse production. That’s according to Anurag Tulshan, director of pulse brokerage Esarco Exim Pvt. Ltd. and a member of the India Pulses and Grains Association (IPGA) executive committee. Speaking here Tuesday at the Grain World conference, Tulshan said the 50 per cent tariff — the maximum allowable under World Trade Organization rules — was also a bit of a surprise to the Indian industry, as expectations had been for more modest 10-15 per cent tariffs. However, with a belief that Indian farmers were receiving a “raw deal” due to competition from cheaper imports, the government stepped in with the tariffs in an effort to support the domestic agriculture sector, he said, adding that the country aims to become self-sufficient in pulse production by 2022.Read more


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  • Govt doubles import duty on wheat to 20 pc

    New Delhi, Nov 8 The government today doubled the import duty on wheat to 20 per cent to curb cheap shipments and give positive price signal to farmers in the ongoing Rabi season. It also imposed import duty of 50 per cent on peas to check cheaper shipments from countries like Canada. The Central Board of Excise and Customs (CBEC) in a notification said that it seeks “to (i) increase rate of basic customs duty on Peas, (Pisum sativum) from present Nil rate to 50%. (ii) increase rate of basic customs duty on wheat from 10% to 20%.” In March, the government had imposed 10 per cent import duty on wheat to contain sharp fall in local prices in view of bumper crop of 98.38 million tonnes in 2016-17 crop year (July-June). Read more


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  • Pulses end steady in tight movements

    New Delhi, Oct 28 (PTI) There was not much activity at the wholesale pulses market today as prices by and large moved in a narrow range on alternate bouts of trading and settled at previous levels. Traders said adequate stocks position against sporadic demand mainly kept prices unaltered. Following are today’s pulses rates (in Rs per quintal): Urad Rs 4,200-5,700, Urad Chilka (local) Rs 5,300-5,400, Urad best Rs 5,400-5,900, Dhoya Rs 5,800-6,000, Moong Rs 4,700-5,400, Dal Moong Chilka local Rs 5,400-5,600, Moong Dhoya local Rs 6,000-6,500 and best quality Rs 6,500-6,700. Masoor small Rs 3,500-3,600, bold Rs 3,550-3,700, Dal Masoor local Rs 3,600-4,100, best quality Rs 3,700-4,200, Malka local Rs 4,400-4,600, best Rs 4,500-4,700, Moth Rs 3,600-4,000, Arhar Rs 3,900, Dal Arhar Dara Rs 5,700-7,600.Read more


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  • Centre to trim buffer stock limit for pulses

    Saddled with surplus pulses, the Centre is all set to cut down on the 20 lakh tonne buffer stock that was created after the prices of the kitchen staple had shot through the roof two years ago. With prices of pulses touching Rs 200 per kg in 2015, the Centre had first announced a buffer stock of eight lakh tonnes of the primary protein source for vegetarians and later enhanced it to 20 lakh tonnes. “We still have 18 lakh tonnes of pulses and are in the process of offloading to replenish the stock,” a senior official in the Department of Consumer Affairs told DH. He said the buffer stock policy had achieved one of its key goals – encouraging farmers to take up production of pulses in a big way. “In 2016-17 we had a record production of pulses and farmers are expected to repeat the rich harvest this year too,” he said. Read more


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  • Pulses remain weak on muted demand

    New Delhi, Oct 27 () Weak conditions prevailed at the wholesale pulses market today as select pulses led by rajmah chitra fell by upto Rs 200 per quintal owing to slackened demand against sufficient stocks position. Traders said besides easing demand from retailers, ample stocks position on increased supplies from producing regions, mainly led to decline in rajmah chitra and other pulses prices. In the national capital, rajmah chitra fell by Rs 200 to Rs 7,500-9,800 per quintal. Masoor small and bold declined by Rs 100 each to Rs 3,500-3,600 and Rs 3,550-3,700 per quintal respectively. Its dal local and best quality traded lower by a similar margin to Rs 3,600-4,100 and Rs 3,700-4,200 per quintal.Read more


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  • Pulses: Canadian pulse exports well off year-ago pace

    Winnipeg, Oct. 27 (CNS Canada) – Canada exported 28,100 tonnes of peas during the week ended October 22, taking the year-to-date total to 848,500 tonnes. That’s about half-a-million tonnes behind the exports reported during the same time period the previous year. The pace of lentil exports is also behind on the year, with the 86,900 tonnes exported to date well off the 307,200 tonnes during the first 12 weeks of the 2016/17 crop year. The USDA issued a tender to purchase roughly 190,000 cases of canned dried beans for use in the National School Lunch Program, according to reports.Read more


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  • Farmer fair price, MRPs could be new way forward

    There is a need for new thinking in the management of prices of agricultural produce beyond the minimum support price and the tweaking of import/export prices/permits, which also is limited to some commodities and not entirely satisfactory in outcomes. Every manufacturer has the right to ask for a reasonable return. However, farmers are the lone category of producers who are being made to feel as if a favour is being done to them by buying their produce. Similarly, there are no maximum retail prices (MRP) for these items or those that are made known in the public domain; consumers never …Read more


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  • Experts for tech pill to boost pulse production

    Bhubaneswar: Technological intervention to increase the production of pulses in a scientific manner is the need of the hour, felt scientists. More than 30 experts from various agriculture universities and research institutions under the Indian Council of Agricultural Research and the central department of biotechnology, attended a meeting organised by the Institute of Life Sciences and the department here. S.R. Rao, the department’s senior adviser, called for science and technology-based interventions to improve productivity of pulses with an overall objective to enhance farmers’ income in rain-fed areas. “We should emphasise on a joint and co-ordinated approach to work in the area of genetic resources, genomics and breeding for improved quality,” he said. Institute of Life Sciences director Ajay Parida said pulses, particularly black gram, green gram, horse gram and rice bean, which were widely cultivated earlier no longer find a place these days.  Read more


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